Pitching Hacks for Content Creators – A Boss Babe’s Guide

Pitching Hacks for Content Creators – A Boss Babe’s Guide

Lifehack, dining hacks, wine hacks, career hacks, relationship hacks, tech hacks, dicing onion hacks – there are hacks for pretty much everything these days, thanks to digital media that has brought all this information to our fingertips. Including yass- worthy information for content creators such as: how to pitch to an editor.

I think content creators will agree that this is the grandmaster question – getting your A-game on when pitching will get you a foot in the door of all doors and then your content, timing and other factors will seal the deal.

First things first, get your foot in the door:

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Intentional pitching

Intentional action equals intentional results, so don’t be lackadaisical in your actions. For example, when looking for a job, it is expected that you should know the industry you want to enter, and you tailor your resume to fit its specifications.

You don’t send out resumes randomly to any company or in response to any vacancy. You will only land random interviews, not necessarily from the industry you want. Another hack to sending out resumes is to tailor your resume to each job requirement.

Don’t send out a resume, [one] resume to 20 different employers who don’t have the same job requirements. Now, apply this same principle to pitching. Ensure that you meet the requirements of the publication which you intend to pitch to, and your content matches its editorial standards.

You should not send out random pitches to editors in hopes that an editor somewhere, will randomly be interested in what you have to offer.

It can happen, but the results will turn out to be a lot more rejections than a foot in the door. Hard work? Yeah, who says good things don’t come without effort. Put in the work, and it will be worth your time eventually.

Pitching hack number two: Know your audience

In the words of Pauleanna Reid:

“Your company addresses a need for a specific type of person. You need to figure out where this person lives. Not geographically, [but] what publications are they reading?”

And we agree! You can’t sell to everyone, babe. If your content is tailored to meet the needs of young people, pitch to youth-oriented organizations and not to communities for the elderly.

Armed with this knowledge, the next step is to find out what publications your audience is reading, and then you can now pitch to organizations with a similar public.

Should we continue? As much as we would love to, we have to leave you in the able hands of Forbes senior contributor, Pauleanna Reid who spoke at Xonecole’s #elevetahercrawl event.

Watch the full talk below.

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